GP: My first year as a writer by J M Woodall

This week’s guest poster is the lovely J M Woodall, author of Like A Fox on the Run.  He discusses his experience during the first year of being a writer.  Enjoy!

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My First Year as A Writer

by J M Woodall

No one ever wakes up one morning and just decides, “Hey! I think I’ll become an author today!” Right?

Well, as much as it seemed that’s what I did, I promise you, that’s not how it went down. As I approach my first year as a published author, I take a slight pause to reflect on just what a wild and crazy ride it’s been in just a few, short months.

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GP: I Wanna Give Good Query by Cass Alexander

Oh yes, she’s back!  My (becoming a regular) guest poster Cass Alexander, author of the Persimmon Series is back to show us just how she did her last query letter. 😀

Cass1I Wanna Give Good Query

by Cass Alexander

I hesitate to write this post as it will truly demonstrate to readers that I do things I probably shouldn’t. My mouth runs faster than my brain. It always has. Now, my fingers type and click Send on emails faster than my brain can process the whole of what I’ve sent.

I recently wrote a query letter and I’d like to share my experience with the Universe.

My brother and I are currently writing a non-fiction humor book. We had always planned to self-publish. However, after zero research and one or two impulsive texts, we thought it would be a great idea to query a publisher. Bro is super busy, so he gave me the go ahead to do it myself. He really shouldn’t have. Wanna see it? Below is the first half. Try not to cringe as you read.

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Why you should Embrace your Mistakes

 

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Image purchased from Storyblocks.com

Do you embrace your mistakes?

 

I think there is a part in all of us that loves the idea of holding ourselves accountable to mistakes me make.  But that’s not always the case, is it?

So why don’t we embrace our mistakes?

Maybe you blame schools… or parents… or bosses!  Because they are easy to blame.  Though maybe the real culprit is society.

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GP: My name’s not Cass, but you can call me Cass

Once again I have been harassing other writers to guest post on this blog. This week’s guester is the lovely Cass Alexander, who talks about whether to use a Pen Name. Enjoy!

Cass1My Name’s Not Cass, But You Can Call Me Cass

by Cass Alexander

Prior to publishing my first romance novel, my husband and I debated whether I should publish under my real name or use a pen name. Marketing, in the short term, would be easier if I used my legit name, because I know lots of people. And, let’s face it, it’s pretty damn cool to see your name slapped on the cover of a book.

But, in the end, I didn’t have the balls to use my real name. Like all healthy, well-adjusted citizens of the world, I blame societal pressures.

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How questions help your writing

Are you writing a novel?questionsface

Chances are then you will constantly be generating questions for yourself.

You aren’t?

Well you should!

Now I’ve talked about The Power of Questions before but I feel I need to talk about it again!

We all know writing a novel is hard.

You have to build a landscape, create characters, give voices, design conflict, structure a plot… there’s a lot to think about.

As well as all that, you have to be consistent, you have to remember subplots, tie up loose ends, keep characters on track.

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Guest post: How to keep writing when all hell breaks loose

This week’s guest poster is the lovely Elke Feuer who shares some great tips for how to keep writing when things become difficult. Enjoy!

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How to keep writing when all hell breaks loose

by Elke Feuer

Writing is difficult enough, but when life rears its ugly head with unexpected events and emergencies, sitting down to write can seem impossible. Whether it’s a nasty cold, a class project your child mentions the day before it’s due, or a notice from your boss about working later or on the weekend, you can still write.

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Guest post: But for the Grace

This week’s guest post is the lovely Annette Rochelle Aben who has written a short story. Enjoy!

AnnetteBut For The Grace

by Annette Rochelle Aben

Being swallowed by the dark, Caryn felt she’d never live to see the dawn…

Everything was in place. It was only a matter of time. Caryn knew she had made the right decision and there was no turning back.

She settled on the loveseat, glanced at the clock and noted that the hour was fast approaching. Calling to her two companions was unnecessary, her babies hopped up into her lap within moments of her sitting. How funny her male cats were in comparison to the females she had in the past. Her male cats were the most affectionate, always wanting to be on her lap, sleeping next to her in bed and enjoyed being petted. Caryn gently stroked each of the cats pouring as much love as she had into each caress.

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How do I find time to write?

Manage your time, organise your time, organize your time, get organisedI thought I’d write about it finding time! I have done articles on time-management before, but there’s always more to say.

Finding Time sounds so strange, as if rooting between the sofa cushions may yield a few extra scraps of time we didn’t know we had. 🙂

Someone recently asked whether they could make money from writing full time. In truth almost all writers want to write full time. Who doesn’t want to get paid doing what they love?

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Fine tune your writing with detail

cal-0814-va4-detect_07I thought I would do a quick article about ‘detail’ in writing. I think it can be one of those things that gets overlooked.

While we can wax lyrical in our descriptions we can still end up missing something and that can often be extra detail.

But why is detail so important?

Simply because detail adds an extra layer to the writing to help draw the reader deeper into your world.

Maybe you’re sat there thinking “well I add detail, I fill my writing with description.” Great, you should make sure there is strong description. But too often writers can end up using notion rather than detail.

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