GP: The creative process or my lunacy by Tavera Del Toro

This week’s guest poster is the lovely Tavera Del Toro, author of Revenge Chair.  Here Tavera discusses the creative process. Enjoy!

tavThe creative process or my lunacy

by Tavera Del Toro

When I tell people I write novels, they often ask me where in the world do I get my ideas, which after a few general answers, I usually just say, “I don’t know, it just flashes into my head”. To be honest, that’s a half truth.

Like any art or endeavor, one can’t just perch down at your desk and inform your brain, “Okay, brain tell me a story!”

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GP: Interview with author Kim Chance

I am fortunate to have the wonderful Kim Chance, author of Keeper, back on this blog.  Check out her interview below.

Kim Chance1Interview with Kim Chance 

1 – Have you always wanted to be a writer?

I feel kind of strange saying this, but no. Writing has been a part of my life for as long as I can remember. I wrote some short stories and poetry as a kid, but most of my writing took the form of daily diaries and journals.

I still have a box full of them! Once digital journals became a thing (anyone remember LiveJournal?), I kept one all through high school and college. Writing has always played a key role in helping me process the world and my feelings about it.

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10 Things I have Learnt about being a writer

Stack of vintage books isolated on white01 Writing takes practice

Of course it takes practice.  It is like anything, you can bring all the talent you have to a creative endeavour, but if you are going to progress you need to practice.

Skill is developed and it needs space and time to grow.  I am actually saddened when I see new writers who say “I’ve started writing a novel,” and then a month later they are publishing it.

I am sure there are the odd savants out there who can churn out a novel and edit it within a month and it’s a masterpiece.  Let me just say I haven’t come across any yet.  Writing needs patient, time and a helluva lot of blood, sweat and tears.

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GP: My first year as a writer by J M Woodall

This week’s guest poster is the lovely J M Woodall, author of Like A Fox on the Run.  He discusses his experience during the first year of being a writer.  Enjoy!

me2

My First Year as A Writer

by J M Woodall

No one ever wakes up one morning and just decides, “Hey! I think I’ll become an author today!” Right?

Well, as much as it seemed that’s what I did, I promise you, that’s not how it went down. As I approach my first year as a published author, I take a slight pause to reflect on just what a wild and crazy ride it’s been in just a few, short months.

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GP: Interview with Tony Brady

This week’s guest post is an interview with the wonderful Tony Brady, auther of the Thousand Scars series.  Enjoy!

tony

Interview with Tony Brady

01 – Have you always wanted to be a writer?

I’m not going to say that I’ve always wanted to be a writer in particular, but I have always loved to write and it doesn’t surprise me that my writing has been getting all the attention lately. I have always wanted to make the world a better place. That is my goal, that is my purpose. That is what I shall be.

02 – What inspires your writing?

A lot of things effect my writing and there are sometimes the occasional happenings that inspire it as well. The greater accomplishments of man, both wretched and divine, push me to write when I see or hear of them. Those potent influences effect all of my art. I paint, draw, write poems and tattoo as well as write novels and short stories.

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ReBlog: How To Handle The Slow Burn Story

Since I had no guest poster set up for this week, I thought I would share someone else’s wisdom with a reblog instead! Check out this great article from BlondeWriteMore Blog.

BlondeWriteMore

This is something I have experienced lately, writing the slow burn story.

These tales are unique because they take AGES to come out of you.

They are normally written in dribs and drabs which can be very frustrating for an impatient blonde writer, like myself.

A slow burn story is a form of creative torture as your naughty muse gives you a little titbit of the story (equating to a few pages) and that’s it for a few days, weeks or even months.

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GP: My name’s not Cass, but you can call me Cass

Once again I have been harassing other writers to guest post on this blog. This week’s guester is the lovely Cass Alexander, who talks about whether to use a Pen Name. Enjoy!

Cass1My Name’s Not Cass, But You Can Call Me Cass

by Cass Alexander

Prior to publishing my first romance novel, my husband and I debated whether I should publish under my real name or use a pen name. Marketing, in the short term, would be easier if I used my legit name, because I know lots of people. And, let’s face it, it’s pretty damn cool to see your name slapped on the cover of a book.

But, in the end, I didn’t have the balls to use my real name. Like all healthy, well-adjusted citizens of the world, I blame societal pressures.

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Guest Post: Own it baby. Work it!

This week’s guest poster is the lovely Sandie Docker who discusses being a writer. Enjoy 🙂

sandie-dockerOwn it baby. Work it!

by Sandie Docker

“So, what do you do?”

A simple question. One, unless you’re a spy, that is answered easily.

Except it isn’t.

It’s a question that fills me with dread. Because what I am, is a writer. But I’m an unpublished writer so to answer that most simple of questions I feel like a complete fraud if I answer with the truth. I have no books out in the world. I don’t get paid to write.There is no tangible proof of what I do (other than my manuscripts languishing in various slush piles waiting to find a home). And even though I write every day (nearly), and I do courses which in other circles would be considered ‘professional development’, and I’m chasing my dream with query letter after query letter, and all those memes out there tell me that if I write I’m a writer, it still feels wrong to say it out loud. “I’m a writer.”

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Avoiding Deus ex Machina

Ex Machina.jpgDeus Ex…what?

Originally this term meant “God from the Machine” and was in reference to when a “god” character in a play was lowered on stage via a cable device. The god was often brought in as a divine intervention for a situation that was unfixable.

The term has changed now and is used as a negative connotation to explain a sudden illogical plot twist used to completely alter a situation. Sadly this sort of thing happens in fiction whereby someone or something is introduced into the plotline just to create a contrived solution to an unsolvable issue / conflict.

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Guest Post: 15 Tips for Self-Publishing (the second time around)

This week’s guest post is the wonderful Suzanne Rogerson, author of Visions of Zarua, sharing her tips for self publishing 🙂

Visions of Zarua Book Cover15 Tips for Self-Publishing (the second time around) by Suzanne Rogerson

First some back ground on me;

When I self-published my first fantasy novel Visions of Zarua in 2015 I was a complete novice. The ebook was published in November, and then after a hasty change of heart, I published the paperback in December.

It was an intense time but I was lucky to have the support of my editor, Alison Williams, to answer my many questions and the rest I researched on the internet.

 

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